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LU student selected "Global Swede" 2016

Student Stephanie Jenny Angeraini at the Global Swede 2016 ceremony Congratulations to Stephanie Jenny Angeraini, a student of the Energy-Efficient and Environmental Building Design Master’s programme at Lund University, who was awarded the title Global Swede at a ceremony at the Swedish Institute last week.

Study finds nanoplastics to negatively affect aquatic animals

Study fiound that fish that ate the zooplankton Daphnia containing nanoplastics experienced a change in their predatory behaviour and poor appetite. Photo: Pixabay Plastic accounts for nearly eighty per cent of all waste found in our oceans, gradually breaking down into smaller and smaller particles. New research from Lund University investigates how nanosized plastic particles affect aquatic animals in different parts of the food chain.

New ultrasound method increases awareness about cancer cells

Researchers have developed a method to analyse and separate cells from the blood using a method called "iso-acoustic focusing". Researchers at Lund University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the United States have developed a method to analyse and separate cells from the blood. Ultimately, the method, which goes under the name iso-acoustic focusing, can become significant to measure the efficiency of cancer treatments for individuals.

WATCH: Solar cells of the future could be based on iron molecules

New findings could lead to cheaper and more environmentally friendly solar cells Researchers at Lund University have successfully explained how iron-based dyes work on a molecular level in solar cells. The new findings will accelerate the development of inexpensive and environmentally friendly solar cells.

Degree project contributes to debate on sustainable construction and biodiversity

"we want to design for biodiversity, we should move towards sharing the city with the ecosystem, this is what land-sharing architecture is about" says Wictor Berg about his degree project at LTH. After creating space for biodiversity on street fronts, streets and roofs, it is time for architects and urban planners to utilise the space indoors to increase diversity among plant and animal species, argues Wiktor Bergh, one of the around 40 architecture students estimated to leave the Faculty of Engineering (LTH) at Lund University with a degree this spring.

Increased vegetation in the Arctic region may counteract global warming

New study indicates that changes to the arctic region, imposed by a changing and warming climate, may have inhibiting effect on global warming. Photo: J. Rousk Climate change creates more shrub vegetation in barren, arctic ecosystems. A study at Lund University in Sweden shows that organisms, such as bacteria and fungi, are triggered to break down particularly nutritious dead parts of shrubbery. Meanwhile, the total amount of decomposition is reducing. This could have an inhibiting effect on global warming.

When dung beetles dance, they photograph the firmament

When the beetles dance on top of a ball of dung, they simultaneously take a photograph  of how celestial bodies are positioned so  that they know where to go. Photo: Basil el Jundi The discovery that dung beetles use the light of the Milky Way to navigate in the world has received much praise. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now taken a new step in understanding the existence of these unique beetles: when the beetles dance on top of a ball of dung, they simultaneously take a photograph - a snapshot - of how celestial bodies are positioned.

Press invitation: Inauguration of MAX IV Laboratory – the world’s most modern synchrotron facility to make the invisible visible

The MAX IV Laboratory is being Inaugurated. Photo: ABML4/Felix Gerlach On 21 June, at 13:08:55, when the sun peaks in the sky, it is time for Sweden to inaugurate its biggest ever investment in national research infrastructure – MAX IV Laboratory in Lund. Journalists are very welcome during all parts of the inauguration week to get a unique peek into the laboratory and its research.

New findings explain the connection between melatonin and type 2 diabetes

A new experimental and clinical study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the sleep hormone melatonin impairs insulin secretion in people with a common gene variant. Photo:  Agência Brasil Fotografias A new experimental and clinical study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the sleep hormone melatonin impairs insulin secretion in people with a common gene variant. “This could explain why the risk of type 2 diabetes is greater among, for instance, overnight workers or people with sleeping disorders”, says Professor Hindrik Mulder who is responsible for the study.

New archaeological method finds children were skilled ceramists during the Bronze Age

New archaeological method finds children were skilled ceramists during the Bronze Age. Photo: K. Botwid Artisanal interpretation of ceramics from the Bronze Age shows that a nine-year-old child could be a highly skilled artisan. This was one of the discoveries presented in a new thesis from Lund University. The thesis explores how an artisanal perspective can contribute to archaeology by providing new insights into archaeological artefacts.

Press office contact

Cecilia Schubert
International Media Officer
cecilia [dot] schubert [at] kommunikation [dot] lu [dot] se

+46 (0)46 222 7046

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